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Author Topic: NYTimes TV Section asks...  (Read 1360 times)

Clay Zambo

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NYTimes TV Section asks...
« on: August 03, 2004, 11:13:29 AM »
The cover story in this week's TV section is a discussion of GSN's new programming philosophy, featuring some lovely pictures of Bill Cullen and Arlene Francis as compared with Andy Dick and an Extreme Dodgeball team.

Since it's not available online--or doesn't seem to be--I'll quote the concluding 'graph, which discusses their interactive games:

"It's not quite the same as covering your eyes and ears while the 'What's My Line?' announcer reveals contestants' occupations, but maybe that's a good thing."
czambo@mac.com

uncamark

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NYTimes TV Section asks...
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2004, 05:53:00 PM »
[quote name=\'Clay Zambo\' date=\'Aug 3 2004, 10:13 AM\']The cover story in this week's TV section is a discussion of GSN's new programming philosophy, featuring some lovely pictures of Bill Cullen and Arlene Francis as compared with Andy Dick and an Extreme Dodgeball team.

Since it's not available online--or doesn't seem to be--I'll quote the concluding 'graph, which discusses their interactive games:

"It's not quite the same as covering your eyes and ears while the 'What's My Line?' announcer reveals contestants' occupations, but maybe that's a good thing."[/quote]
The TV book doesn't seem to ever make the online edition, probably because it's not available nationally (in fact, I thought the TV listings were still in Arts & Leisure in the Sunday New York metro editions).

Of course, I have to call them on covering their ears--the occupation was always revealed just visually and the announcers, from Lee Vines to Johnny O, never said anything between the opening and the credits.  Perhaps they're thinking of "Password"...
« Last Edit: August 03, 2004, 05:53:21 PM by uncamark »

CaseyAbell

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NYTimes TV Section asks...
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2004, 08:02:57 AM »
Does the story acknowledge that GSN carries What's My Line every day? It's an ungodly hour, of course, but TiVo can fix that.

The goof about the announcer telling the audience the contestant's occupation doesn't encourage me about the accuracy of the story.