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Author Topic: Successful game shows with no home editions  (Read 3188 times)

SuperMatch93

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2022, 12:57:02 PM »
Another possibility: it would have been impossible to rank the buzz-ins at home by priority.

You could do what MB's $ale game did; everyone throws a chip in a bucket and whoever is on the bottom gets to answer first.

I was thinking about how I'd design a non-electric version and although you'd have to change the rules somewhat, I'd probably have players write down their answers. You could include pads where everyone writes down an answer in private, and the first person to show for each part gets credit if their answer is correct.
-William https://dekochunterzz.bandcamp.com/
“30 years from now, people won’t care what we’re doing right now." - Bob Barker on The Price is Right, 1983

Blanquepage

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2022, 01:04:47 PM »
I think Bumper Stumpers, Celebrity Sweepstakes, Treasure Hunt, & The Liar's Club all fall into this category.

SamJ93

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2022, 02:26:55 PM »
I'm on mobile now so it's tough to dig through the home games thread right now, but wasn't there mention of an America Says home game planned that ultimately never came to fruition?
It was Bob Barker. He was eating a bologna and cheese-ball sandwich.

The Ol' Guy

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2022, 04:03:54 PM »
Using the 50s versions rule, Treasure Hunt would have been covered, as a small outfit named Gardner Games put out a fairly decent version with Jan Murray on the cover. https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/27010/jan-murrays-treasure-hunt. If you're lucky enough to find one, you could do a spin off Bumper Stumpers with this board game - https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/8431/vanity-chase.

Clay Zambo

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2022, 05:06:57 PM »
Actually, the demands on whoever would be the “host”—rank the buzz-ins, judge the answers, parse out the money for a correct answer after each question, etc.—

Don't forget splitting your living room in half to reveal the five cars behind it! ;)
czambo@mac.com

jage

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2022, 06:20:45 PM »
Gambit

No, but there was a High Rollers game for Apple II and I'm sure others.

That Don Guy

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #21 on: May 23, 2022, 09:26:59 PM »
Gambit

No, but there was a High Rollers game for Apple II and I'm sure others.

There was also a High Rollers board game; in fact, I think it was one of the consolation prizes at some point.

TimK2003

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2022, 10:23:22 PM »
High Rollers board games?  There was a Trebek version that happened during the first incarnation and a version from the Wink Martindale era.


Speaking of Wink, I don't think there was ever a board or video game for Debt.

SuperMatch93

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2022, 11:05:27 PM »
The one that eats at me most (especially because I saw a localized version while traveling in Italy but it was 45 euros) though it would be a tough ask for people to play the game straight is Greed.

The one that eats at me the most is the Australian boxed version of Temptation that we never got here. Might it have been a rare box game that was even better than the show if it had come out here?
-William https://dekochunterzz.bandcamp.com/
“30 years from now, people won’t care what we’re doing right now." - Bob Barker on The Price is Right, 1983

Bob Zager

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #24 on: May 24, 2022, 02:34:24 PM »
it surprises me that no US based home game version of "The Wall," has come out despite many foreign editions having been released.

There really haven't been that many based on shows produced for cable-tv networks, including GSN. 

Jimmy Owen

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #25 on: May 24, 2022, 02:49:27 PM »
it surprises me that no US based home game version of "The Wall," has come out despite many foreign editions having been released.

There really haven't been that many based on shows produced for cable-tv networks, including GSN.
No new shows would have the critical mass to warrant a box game.
Let's Make a Deal was the first show to air on Buzzr. 6/1/15 8PM.

Neumms

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #26 on: May 24, 2022, 03:50:31 PM »
It's Your Bet ran three years. I wish Magnificent Marble Machine had lasted long enough.

That Don Guy

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #27 on: May 24, 2022, 07:13:29 PM »
High Rollers board games?  There was a Trebek version that happened during the first incarnation and a version from the Wink Martindale era.

Description of the board game, with pictures of both versions

SuperMatch93

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #28 on: May 24, 2022, 09:17:47 PM »
High Rollers board games?  There was a Trebek version that happened during the first incarnation and a version from the Wink Martindale era.

Description of the board game, with pictures of both versions

The first 70s edition was notable for including a number of questions that were virtually unanswerable due to how general they were.

From what I understand, there was a misprint of some sort that resulted in some questions from the Now You See It game being included.
-William https://dekochunterzz.bandcamp.com/
“30 years from now, people won’t care what we’re doing right now." - Bob Barker on The Price is Right, 1983

Adam Nedeff

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Re: Successful game shows with no home editions
« Reply #29 on: May 24, 2022, 09:34:53 PM »
Gambit
Gambit is the one that surprises me most, just because of how easy it would have been for Milton Bradley to release one in the days when MB was just churning out games. Deck of cards, booklet of Qs provided from the show's "used" files, and a deck of prize cards repurposed from what they already made for their WOF and TPIR games. Boom. Gambit home game.