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Author Topic: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?  (Read 2074 times)

Otm Shank

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2021, 10:59:52 PM »
I also think it's possible to play first-to-3 games (and maybe a modified short-charge playoff against the villains' blocks for a 2-2 game) when you play the games back-to-back.
Of course you'd probably need to resort to a player vs. villains extra round if someone wins 3-0, to keep the stretching to a minimum.
Yeah, that's what I was thinking just to keep the time budget somewhat aligned. Of course, I am still mentally anchored in the live-to-tape gameplay, rather than excessively stretching or hacking. But there could be other ways around it.

TLEberle

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #31 on: September 18, 2021, 02:44:42 AM »
“Anybody who wins in a 3-0 sweep will get to run the Gauntlet twice for up to $100,000 in cash.” Maybe instead of a 2-2 tie being a shootout the players could form a team and split the money.
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chris319

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #32 on: September 18, 2021, 05:49:02 AM »
Whew! was exhilarating for the players but the audience (housewives) had to work to keep up, which is why it didn't last beyond the summer of '79. You can't make the audience work too hard to keep up with your game.

It had clever writing but it went by too fast for the audience to savor. Take away the clock from the main game and you might have something. I'm not going to ask Jay if he ever ran it thru without a clock but he should have. The end game was a blur but it only lasted for what, 60 seconds? You'd wind up with a show like password; the main game is not timed but the end game is. Agreed that it had great music.

Who owns Whew! now and who sold it to them? Apparently some combination of Burt Sugarman and Bud Austin (nee Harold Augenblick) owned it originally.

I was shopping a show to CBS at the same time Jay was developing Blackout. Barbara Hunter and Mike Brockman opted for Jay's magnificent creation. How did that work out for you, guys? I also shopped my show (call it The New Say When!!) to Larry Hovis (who was a really nice guy). He loved it and asked NBC to reconsider their rejection of it, to no avail. I showed it to ABC and they were clueless. Ira Skutch saw it and called it "ingenious" but it ultimately went nowhere.

MG/HS Hour had problems with panelist bookings. People at MGP knew it at the time. Many panelists were nobodies at the time and they're still nobodies nigh onto 40 years later. Lots of soap-opera actors, even from soaps on CBS! Nedra Volz was their one success story.

Ian Wallis

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #33 on: September 18, 2021, 11:16:24 AM »
“Anybody who wins in a 3-0 sweep will get to run the Gauntlet twice for up to $100,000 in cash.” Maybe instead of a 2-2 tie being a shootout the players could form a team and split the money.

When the show was cancelled in May 1980, I was hoping that it might show up in one of the checkboard prime access slots that fall.  Although most shows were expanding to five-nights-a-week at that time, there still we a few of those once-weekly shows in production.  I was trying to figure out how it would work as a stand-alone show, with the extra five minutes having to be accounted for.  This idea is not bad.  Play a first to 3 with the scenario you just described.  If it's a tie, there probably wouldn't be enough time to play another round plus a guantlet, so splitting the winnings make sense.

$100,000 was given away on those syndicated shows (Name That Tune for one) from time to time back then, and other shows also used that tie scenario where the players split the pot ($25,000 Pyramid if there was a tie in the last game).  How many times would someone have had two successful gauntlet runs anyway?
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Jimmy Owen

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #34 on: September 18, 2021, 02:01:27 PM »
There was a lot of activity at NATPE 80.  Metromedia alone had 5 strips in contention.  Jack Narz, Art James also were busy.  Tom did two NTTs a week, both Squares and Feud went to five days a week, the Barry and Enright trio, Ward TTTT, Hackett YBYL, the Barris shows could have continued, etc.
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Bryce L.

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #35 on: September 18, 2021, 02:16:16 PM »
... the Barris shows could have continued...
I thought Barris' name was mud in 1980 because of 3's a Crowd.

chrisholland03

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #36 on: September 18, 2021, 03:40:48 PM »
$25k was a life altering amount of money for the average 1979 person.  I don't see where raising the stakes to $100k adds anything substantively, other than ensuring the writers generate fewer gauntlet wins.


TLEberle

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #37 on: September 18, 2021, 03:52:03 PM »
I was imagining the Gauntle5 for $50,000 were it played today to keep i5 in lie with the ABC prime time stuff.
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Jimmy Owen

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Re: How did "Whew!" gain cult status?
« Reply #38 on: September 18, 2021, 08:33:43 PM »
... the Barris shows could have continued...
I thought Barris' name was mud in 1980 because of 3's a Crowd.
He decided to Chuck it all, but the other shows were still in demand.
Let's Make a Deal was the first show to air on Buzzr. 6/1/15 8PM.