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Author Topic: Product Placement Question  (Read 1238 times)

Dbacksfan12

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Product Placement Question
« on: August 02, 2021, 07:51:01 PM »
This question is more geared towards shows such as TPiR, LMaD, and Treasure Hunt.

Back in the day, when most prizes were sponsored, could a manufacturer place restrictions on the product/service (e.g. not having a zonk behind the wall)?  Was there a premium to be, say in the showcases or the first IUfB?  Or did the producers have free reign once you agreed to advertise?
--Mark
Phil 4:13

Otm Shank

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Re: Product Placement Question
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2021, 10:21:09 AM »
My sense is that the first scenario you listed probably would not fly, because it has a direct effect on the play of the game. At that time we were still not far from sponsor-driven gameplay issues in game shows. This would mean that people outside of the production company would be privy to a certain result of the game, so that would definitely be a no-go.

I am sure there were other aspects negotiated or even baked into the sponsorship agreement, all of which more favorable terms could generate more money: exclusivity in the product category, positioning within the daily lineup and which days of the week, etc. It would also make sense that they would be sensitive to their sponsor's concerns. If the sponsor, for instance, had a particular aversion to Cliffhangers, then I could see that the producers granting that request. Same if they had a particular aversion to pairing of prizes ("with this bar set comes a supply of eye drops").

Neumms

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Re: Product Placement Question
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2021, 01:36:51 AM »
Back in the day, when most prizes were sponsored, could a manufacturer place restrictions on the product/service (e.g. not having a zonk behind the wall)?  Was there a premium to be, say in the showcases or the first IUfB?  Or did the producers have free reign once you agreed to advertise?

I doubt sponsors thought about it that much. LMAD had no problem putting zonks behind the Sue-Bee Honey billboard. The honey would never BE the zonk and they wouldn't put, say, two competing brands of soup in the same pricing game, but that only makes sense.

Another question: Did game show producers round up their own sponsor deals, did network sales help, or did they subcontract it?

chris319

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Re: Product Placement Question
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2021, 03:24:03 PM »
Quote
Another question: Did game show producers round up their own sponsor deals, did network sales help, or did they subcontract it?

Outside agencies were engaged to deal with the networks. The exception to this would be an emcee's wardrobe deal.

Adam and Scott know a LOT more about this than I do.

ET206

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Re: Product Placement Question
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2021, 12:45:56 AM »
One potential problem I can see deals with the second prize offered in Any Number.  I know today that prize is rarely sponsored, but years ago it was. 
Bob:  You could win this!
Johnny:  It's an electric range!  This Whirlpool electric range (blah, blah, blah), or you could win this!  A new car!
[As the game progresses]
Bob:  That range is nice, but I know you'd rather win that car.

Since the second prize clearly is a consolation prize for not winning a car, I could see a supplier not appreciating its product being used that way.

TLEberle

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Re: Product Placement Question
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2021, 02:57:22 AM »
Everyone understood that the second prize was a consolation for not winning the car, but still better than an odd lot of spare change and dollar bills.
Travis L. Eberle