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Author Topic: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?  (Read 11432 times)

Dbacksfan12

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #60 on: October 14, 2019, 10:49:46 PM »
Contestants were bidding $1 higher than a previous bid even back then.
I thought there were minimum bid increments on this version.
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John 6:35

Bryce L.

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #61 on: October 14, 2019, 11:32:12 PM »
Contestants were bidding $1 higher than a previous bid even back then.
I thought there were minimum bid increments on this version.
Sometimes there were, sometimes there weren't, depended on the item.

Adam Nedeff

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #62 on: October 15, 2019, 10:43:58 PM »
What still surprises me is, multiple people - wasn't it over 60 for one of them - got the price of the complete set on the nose, to the penny, but they did not get their prices by knowing the prices of all of the individual items separately.
Those were "blind items," a little trick that Bob Stewart employed to make it a little bit challenging. One or two items in each Showcase were custom-made items, so viewers couldn't research them. In the event of a tie, the blind items were the ones used for the tiebreakers. The large number of exact bids is just a fluke of good research and math. Viewers found the exact prices for the other items, estimated on the blind items, and the estimates on the blind items, while individually wrong, worked out to the right number.

SuperMatch93

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #63 on: October 16, 2019, 07:30:56 AM »
I'd imagine another contributor to the large amount of close/perfect bids was statistics; when a home viewer game gets 20 million postcards per week or whatever Price got at its peak, there's going to be a lot of similar bids.

Not surprised they eventually brought in the Sweepstakes, especially after that one showcase where they had to break a 62-way tie.
"Game shows aren't about cruelty. They're about greed and wonderful prizes like poorly built catamarans." - Homer Simpson

tvmitch

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #64 on: October 16, 2019, 08:48:50 AM »
Those were "blind items," a little trick that Bob Stewart employed to make it a little bit challenging. One or two items in each Showcase were custom-made items, so viewers couldn't research them. In the event of a tie, the blind items were the ones used for the tiebreakers. The large number of exact bids is just a fluke of good research and math. Viewers found the exact prices for the other items, estimated on the blind items, and the estimates on the blind items, while individually wrong, worked out to the right number.
Also, don't underestimate the number of people who set aside time to send 1,000 postcards or more. When I worked at a local TV station, we had an ongoing postcard contest where one person a day would win a coffee mug or an umbrella, and the amount of postcards we received for those sub-$20 prizes was staggering. People would buy those pre-stamped postcards from the post office in bulk and fill them all out.
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Joe Mello

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #65 on: October 20, 2019, 10:02:10 AM »
Contestants were bidding $1 higher than a previous bid even back then.
I thought there were minimum bid increments on this version.
Sometimes there were, sometimes there weren't, depended on the item.
That same show had minimums for a different prize.
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SamJ93

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #66 on: October 20, 2019, 05:34:13 PM »
The 4:40PM episode of Cullen TPiR today had some of the strangest censoring I've ever seen. The first IUFB, a mini-car, had the name of its manufacturer blacked-out every name Don or Bill mentioned it.

(The location of the manufacturer, Athens, OH, was left uncensored, though...through which it was fairly easy to determine that the car in question was a King Midget.)
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gamed121683

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #67 on: October 20, 2019, 05:39:10 PM »
The 4:40PM episode of Cullen TPiR today had some of the strangest censoring I've ever seen. The first IUFB, a mini-car, had the name of its manufacturer blacked-out every name Don or Bill mentioned it.

(The location of the manufacturer, Athens, OH, was left uncensored, though...through which it was fairly easy to determine that the car in question was a King Midget.)

Obviously, someone at BUZZR despises all definitions of the word "Midget".

PPatters

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #68 on: October 20, 2019, 05:46:49 PM »
Obviously, someone at BUZZR despises all definitions of the word "Midget".

As a slur, I think all “definitions” are offensive. And, from their Facebook, it doesn’t appear that it’s one person that doesn’t like the word, but instead a policy agreed upon by many people.
Patrick

jjman920

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #69 on: October 20, 2019, 09:46:03 PM »
The 4:40PM episode of Cullen TPiR today had some of the strangest censoring I've ever seen. The first IUFB, a mini-car, had the name of its manufacturer blacked-out every name Don or Bill mentioned it.

(The location of the manufacturer, Athens, OH, was left uncensored, though...through which it was fairly easy to determine that the car in question was a King Midget.)
The episode aired today was one that was included on the DVD set from '07, I believe. In fact, both of the first two episodes were. So, I recognized what it was and immediately realized what they were censoring.

I understand the tide is turning finally and the word is being considered a slur, but I believe that it should just be left in as a product of the time. I've felt that in seeing the Censored Eleven cartoons (and others with racial insensitivity) and the sitcoms of the 70's with uses of the N-word. It's a disservice to teaching why we shouldn't go back to what was normal. Air with a disclaimer if there's fear of major backlash.
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Bryce L.

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #70 on: October 20, 2019, 11:48:01 PM »
I understand the tide is turning finally and the word is being considered a slur, but I believe that it should just be left in as a product of the time. I've felt that in seeing the Censored Eleven cartoons (and others with racial insensitivity) and the sitcoms of the 70's with uses of the N-word. It's a disservice to teaching why we shouldn't go back to what was normal. Air with a disclaimer if there's fear of major backlash.
Or, if that's not enough, maybe skip that one for the network, but upload it (uncensored) to the YouTube page (like they did with the Jim Hess episode of PYL).

JakeT

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #71 on: October 21, 2019, 06:56:36 PM »
I understand the tide is turning finally and the word is being considered a slur, but I believe that it should just be left in as a product of the time. I've felt that in seeing the Censored Eleven cartoons (and others with racial insensitivity) and the sitcoms of the 70's with uses of the N-word. It's a disservice to teaching why we shouldn't go back to what was normal. Air with a disclaimer if there's fear of major backlash.

The answer is quite simple...

What WAS once normal no longer IS normal...there is much in our history that was once considered "normal" but that, by no means, suggests we should embrace it or celebrate it now...if you don't get how the insensitivity and bigotry of the past can still harm people in the present, that's on you...

JakeT

JakeT

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #72 on: October 21, 2019, 06:58:10 PM »
Or, if that's not enough, maybe skip that one for the network, but upload it (uncensored) to the YouTube page (like they did with the Jim Hess episode of PYL).

Why the need/desperation to hear words that you already know are there but will hurt others if they do air? 

JakeT

Allstar87

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #73 on: October 21, 2019, 08:21:03 PM »
Or, if that's not enough, maybe skip that one for the network, but upload it (uncensored) to the YouTube page (like they did with the Jim Hess episode of PYL).

Why the need/desperation to hear words that you already know are there but will hurt others if they do air? 

JakeT

Some people like seeing the shows as they originally aired, warts and all. It's not embracing or celebrating awfulness; it's simply acknowledging that it was there.

Warner Brothers handles the issue pretty elegantly with the disclaimer on some of their cartoon DVDs. Adding something like that to the internet uploads would be a decent solution; the original is online for people who want to see it, and the edited version is on TV for those who don't. (Or if it can't be edited without disrupting the game, it stays online-only.)

Different viewers have different sensitivities, there's nothing bad about that. By making edited and unedited versions available in some form, both parties can be satisfied.

JakeT

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Re: Cullen TPIR on Buzzr?
« Reply #74 on: October 21, 2019, 08:39:37 PM »
Or, if that's not enough, maybe skip that one for the network, but upload it (uncensored) to the YouTube page (like they did with the Jim Hess episode of PYL).

Why the need/desperation to hear words that you already know are there but will hurt others if they do air? 

JakeT

Some people like seeing the shows as they originally aired, warts and all. It's not embracing or celebrating awfulness; it's simply acknowledging that it was there.

Warner Brothers handles the issue pretty elegantly with the disclaimer on some of their cartoon DVDs. Adding something like that to the internet uploads would be a decent solution; the original is online for people who want to see it, and the edited version is on TV for those who don't. (Or if it can't be edited without disrupting the game, it stays online-only.)

Different viewers have different sensitivities, there's nothing bad about that. By making edited and unedited versions available in some form, both parties can be satisfied.

At the risk of having to repeat myself, "if you don't get how the insensitivity and bigotry of the past can still harm people in the present, that's on you..."

This isn't about "different sensitivities"...this is just one in a slew of examples of the bigoted history in our nation and you, among others, are eager to sweep this under the rug and accuse decent-minded people who want to see the end of such prejudices of being overly-sensitive...

There is a simple principle that all humans are expected to live by: right vs. wrong...when you refuse to acknowledge this and are willing to condone the sins of the past for the sake of your own personal entertainment, it's time for you to perhaps take a moment for some personal reflection...

JakeT