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Author Topic: Match Game autograph collection  (Read 620 times)

rstrata

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Match Game autograph collection
« on: May 23, 2020, 12:02:08 AM »
Potter and Potter Auctions in Chicago has a series of curated auctions throughout the year; their yearly playing card and gambling memorabilia one has boosted my collection significantly, but they also specialize in magic and antique toys, as well as the typical rare books, manuscripts, and art pieces that other auction houses handle.  This June features a sampling from all the various categories mashed into one auction, including an item I thought would be of interest to this group:

https://auctions.potterauctions.com/mobile/LotDetail.aspx?inventoryid=27749

Of course, if by chance you wanted Rue McClanahan’s personal copy of “Sweating to the Oldies”, that’s up for bids in the auction too...

Eric Paddon

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Re: Match Game autograph collection
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2020, 02:10:45 AM »
Shecky Greene is the one who wrote, "I was very bored.  I never liked doing those kind of shows and I think the people found me boring too."   I can't make out the signature on the card that says, "I have no memory of Match Game whatsoever."

TwoInchQuad

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  • Posts: 288
Re: Match Game autograph collection
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2020, 04:59:11 AM »
I can't make out the signature on the card that says, "I have no memory of Match Game whatsoever."

I think that might be Robert Culp.

- Kevin

colonial

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  • Posts: 1100
Re: Match Game autograph collection
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2020, 08:09:33 AM »
The "no memory" autograph is definitely Robert Culp.

I saw that the MG collection came from the estate of Jim Weaver -- he was a well-known figure in autograph collecting circles for over 30 years before his passing in 2013. Before there were online sites devoted to the subject, Weaver would put together lists of home addresses, talent agencies, studio sets and third-party PO Boxes for purchase to wanna-be collectors who wanted to request a celebrity's autograph (believe he also listed addresses and celebs to avoid due to no-sign policies, likelihood of pre-print photos and secretarials, etc.). I got back into autograph collecting (primarily for family members -- I generally send birthday cards for celebrities to sign to my daughter and, before her passing, my wife) shortly after Weaver died, but a few collectors have told me how important a "Weaver list" was for them to get their collections started.

When Weaver passed, I recall the person in charge of his estate tried to sell his entire autograph collection at once (which numbered in the tens of thousands) without luck -- it appears it's being sold in parts, which is probably easier.


JD


(*) -- When I started the birthday card collection for my wife around 2013-2014, I made sure to intercept the mail so she didn't know what I was putting together. I forgot one afternoon, and I got a call from my wife asking me "why Bob Newhart sent a birthday card to the house." I fessed up, and she got a kick out of it.